jodimeadows

sci-universe:

The planet we live on, with all its natural spectacularity, is probably the most magnificent thing we can ever experience. We shouldn’t take it for granted. We shouldn’t think of environment problems as petty or that nothing can be done to solve them. The nature was here before us. We depend on it. It makes this planetary home what it is.

Learn how to be nature friendly. We can make this place better if we are willing to. I am glad that Earth Day reminds this internationally and annually. (GIFs: headlikeanorange, gifdrome, sci-universe)

richincolor

Anonymous asked:

What's your opinion on Eleanor & Park?

elloellenoh answered:

Ah, I’ve been wondering when I’d get this question. I admit that I’ve not been very vocal about my feelings on this book because as a fellow author, I don’t feel comfortable speaking negatively about another author’s book. But at the same time I have developed a growing angst over this subject and I will try to put it into words for you. When I first heard of the book, it was through friends who thought I’d be interested in the portrayal of a half-Korean boy. Of course I was! I bought it right away for my daughter. It sounded like a perfect teenage love story. I even recommended it to a friend of mine (non-Korean) who loved it. But then another friend of mine asked me if I had any problems with the depiction of Park and his mother and I hurriedly picked it up before my daughter could read it. Here’s the thing, it IS a lovely little teenage love story. But all I could keep thinking was, Damn it! Why did he have to be Korean? Why did this boy, who is so filled with self-loathing and contempt for his heritage, have to be Korean? Why did his mother with her sing songy broken English have to be Korean?

And because of this, I ended up giving this book away to someone I felt would enjoy it better, a non-Korean. Because I didn’t want my daughter to read this and get that same icky feeling I did. That same humiliating sinking feeling you get when you realize you’ve stumbled across an awful stereotype of a Korean and you cringe that this is all that anyone takes away. And why oh why of all books that could possibly have a diverse main character did it have to be this one that hits the NYT list? Why did Rowell have to include the worst racist comment in the world in this book and think it is okay? Because when Eleanor thinks it, she also at least recognized it was racist. I’m sure that’s why she thought it was ok to include the most racist comment against Asians. But I flinched when I read it. I was so angry when I read it. I hated Eleanor after I read it and I never ever forgave her. No, Asians don’t see things smaller because our eyes are smaller. That is racist. It’s an interesting point to make that you can fall in love with a person of a different culture and still be racist. That’s ultimately Eleanor.

But Park and his mother are more problematic. His mother is described as a chinadoll - a slur in itself. And Park just hates the fact that he doesn’t look more white like his brother. He is filled with self loathing to the point where he even says Asian men are not sexy. SAYS WHO?!! There was a period in my life when I was younger where I pushed away my culture and wished I wasn’t Korean. This was in direct correlation with the amount of racism I endured at the time. So I could understand Park, I could relate to him. But then I FOUND myself! I found my respect and love and pride for my culture. And I recognized just how important my Korean heritage was to me. Park never has that moment of self-discovery. And that is the greatest failure of this book. Because Rowell did not take the opportunity to really understand what it means to be multi-cultural. She wrote a character purely from a white person’s view, never thinking about how a minority person growing up in this country truly feels. The anguish of racism and the complexity of living between two different cultures was never explored. Instead, we are left to believe that Park goes through the rest of his life filled with contempt for his mother’s heritage. A person who wished he was white instead of Asian. And I find myself desperately wishing he’d been white too.

elloellenoh:

lisa-maxwell:

A really interesting post. Yes to so many things—to the China Doll description, to the pain of seeing Park hate part of himself, but especially to the part where Oh never forgives Eleanor for using/thinking in slurs. I think that’s a really authentic—and necessary—response. It’s real—just like Eleanor is for having those thoughts. Because, let’s face it, lots of people who we may or may not ever think of as racist have these moments where horrible, terrible, hateful ideas creep in. Because what we grow up with is often hard to shake off, even when we want to.

But I also think it’s ok to like Eleanor without ever forgiving her, because how many of us have people in our lives that we love, even though they say or believe hateful things? How many of the people we are or know have these deeply conflicting ideas about race and culture and what that all means? Life isn’t neat. Love isn’t neat. And sometime the people we love the most are also the people that we are most ashamed of.

But I do take exception, a bit, when she says Rowell wrote without thinking about how a minority person growing up truly feels… It is absolutely true that it wasn’t explored in any depth. E&P certainly isn’t a YA version of WOMAN WARRIOR or THE BONESETTER’S DAUGHTER or BONE. But I don’t necessarily think that YA writers need to show what teen characters will become, because I don’t believe that people stay they people they are at 15. I didn’t read Park and believe he continued on wishing he’d been white. I read him as a snapshot of a moment, and imagined that he could grow and change the same as any of us. I don’t think 35 year old Park would be just a larger version of 15 year old Park.

But seriously—a great and interesting post. These sorts of discussions are so vital, so important.

I actually believe that you can be a fan of problematic things and I do understand why people love this book. And as an adult, I can hope that Park grows out of his self-loathing. But this book is aimed at young people - teenagers. And I have to ask, what do they take away? Will they have the maturity to say “he’ll grow out of it” or will their take away be Park would rather be white?” Because that was my take away and that was why this book hurt. And I don’t think my criticism  was about  showing what Park’s character would become in the future. It was based solely on who he is in the book - a self-loathing boy who would rather be white. I could have accepted this if he had had even a moment of recognizing his cultural roots. (I had mine at 16, the same age Park is in the book.) But he didn’t, and as a mother of Korean American girls who are battling their own feelings of cultural confusion, it is unacceptable that she left it like that. If an author is not going to address what is a fundamental issue for POC kids growing up in this country, then the author should reconsider writing POC, because writing POC comes with a responsibility to get it right and be respectful.

bethrevis

sswincestiel:

gambling-withdesire:

superbooked:

i want to open a book store that is 24 hours and people can finally go out at like 2am and be like “i just finished the first book in the series i need the next one stat” or if people are just having a stressful night and want to be surrounded by books

My favorite part about this post is that someone understands that it’s calming to be surrounded by books

a book nightclub.

read responsibly.

Someone make this happen pls.

The first half of this post is solved with a ereader…

wiccateachings
wiccateachings:

Easter many believe is a Pagan festival, that when Christians were converting Pagans they kept a lot of Pagan traditions and just put a Christian spin on it, what do bunnies and eggs have to do with the resurrection of Christ? Easter itself is a different date every year because it is determined by the spring equinox, it is always on the first Sunday after the Full Moon of the Spring Equinox.The Goddess Ishtar, also known as Eostre. Below is her legend and Why Easter is celebrated and her resurrection from death in the spring.[Read More]

Actually…
Ishtar was a Babylonian goddess of love, sex and war. Her symbols were the lion, the gate and the eight-pointed star, not rabbits and eggs.
In the Babylonian pantheon, she was the personification of the planet Venus, giving her more in common with the Greek goddess Aphrodite or the Roman goddess, Venus. She’s also been compared to the Egyptian goddess Isis.
Ishtar also has parallels with Persephone, too, as she is said to have descended into the underworld. This story is perhaps why Ishtar is so strongly compared to Spring/Easter.
Most scholars agree that Easter comes from Eostre/Ostara (which has nothing to do with Ishtar) — a Germanicgoddess who was believed to be a goddess of joy and blessing. Her symbols did included rabbits and eggs. 
However, it’s probably not uncommon to associate Ishtar with Eostre, similar to the way Artemis/Selene or Diana/Luna get confused/lumped together. ;)
Also, nearly every Christian holiday has pagan roots, but that’s pretty common knowledge, no?

wiccateachings:

Easter many believe is a Pagan festival, that when Christians were converting Pagans they kept a lot of Pagan traditions and just put a Christian spin on it, what do bunnies and eggs have to do with the resurrection of Christ? Easter itself is a different date every year because it is determined by the spring equinox, it is always on the first Sunday after the Full Moon of the Spring Equinox.

The Goddess Ishtar, also known as Eostre. Below is her legend and Why Easter is celebrated and her resurrection from death in the spring.

[Read More]

Actually…

Ishtar was a Babylonian goddess of love, sex and war. Her symbols were the lion, the gate and the eight-pointed star, not rabbits and eggs.

In the Babylonian pantheon, she was the personification of the planet Venus, giving her more in common with the Greek goddess Aphrodite or the Roman goddess, Venus. She’s also been compared to the Egyptian goddess Isis.

Ishtar also has parallels with Persephone, too, as she is said to have descended into the underworld. This story is perhaps why Ishtar is so strongly compared to Spring/Easter.

Most scholars agree that Easter comes from Eostre/Ostara (which has nothing to do with Ishtar) — a Germanicgoddess who was believed to be a goddess of joy and blessing. Her symbols did included rabbits and eggs. 

However, it’s probably not uncommon to associate Ishtar with Eostre, similar to the way Artemis/Selene or Diana/Luna get confused/lumped together. ;)

Also, nearly every Christian holiday has pagan roots, but that’s pretty common knowledge, no?